Spring 2015

A dinosaur of a tomato, with sepals that want to be leaves!? This mutant of a megabloom is something that happens mostly with tomatoes of pre-columbian origin. A great many european tomatoes have fuzed ovaries but I have never seen any produce leaf-like sepals.


Some progress with anthocyanin tomatoes, it seems this one will be blackening up when the heat of the summer sun comes to ripen them. This like many of her siblings are also “dwarf” tomatoes suitable for small containers, some of which are so small they can thrive in single gallon pots.


When you show a great affection for the earth then she will return the same in kind. Can you name all the native and edible food plants in this photograph?

Or in this one? There are no weeds in my garden. The wild ones all serve a purpose and the line between wild and domesticated is blurred by a different kind of thing, called symbiosis. Our gardens, like our own bodies, are the living memory of mother earth. The Apios and Sunroot in this photo above comes from the body of the first born on Turtle Island, the mother of Good mind.


Fuzzy foliage is one of the most dramatic ways for a tomato to show off and stand out amongst her sisters. Some say the velvet leaves are the most beautiful of any other tomato leaf form, making them ideal specimens for ornamental gardens alongside the purple kale and echinacea.


Anthocyanin tomatoes like these are one of the reasons life can be so excellent. Watching the sun transform the lime green fruit to a deep violet, bringing a promise of sweetness swelling within its flesh.


Thriving through May into the first of June without a single spot of fungus anywhere to be seen, this sugar sweet green-when-ripe cherry tomato is very much like it relative Lost Marbles, being entirely resistant to septoria and being entirely delicious.

To love, to be loved. To never forget your insignificance. To never get used to the vulgar disparity of life around you. To find joy in the saddest places. To seek beauty to its lair. To never simplify what is complicated or complicate what is simple. To respect strength, never power. But above all, to watch. to try and understand. To never look away, and never, never to forget.

-Arundhati Roy

Looking back

Many indigenous cultivars of staple foods are preserved and restored with the proceeds from the wind powered Good Mind Seeds catalog. They are then distributed to the communities which they are culturally significant.

Seneca Bird Egg beans are very productive, and beautiful.

Blue Shackamaxon are Lenni Lenape beans which go from red to purple as they dry down.

cornplanter purple is a purple podded black bean.

beans on tipis do well in hexagonal patterns which leave enough room to crawl between for harvest.

Ga Ga Hut is a Seneca Pinto bean from Ohi:yo.

Seneca Cornstalk bean was called poop in german by amish settlers. i prefer the original name.

Deseronto potato bean is a mohawk bean that tastes very good.

Skunk beans are the same kind as chester and flagg but skunk is the real name. it is mohawk, like the word skunk before it was adopted in english.

seneca corn and beans

new GWR and white tomatoes for the 2015 catalog.

Harvest Time

Mantis warrior protecting my Seneca Bird Egg beans.

Seneca onesteh being rescued from extinction.

Native pollinators vastly outnumber honeybees this year. Please stop spraying poisons.

Mandan corns are beautiful.

someone is playing peekaboo behind the bean flower.

goodnight onesteh. see you again next year.